Posts Tagged ‘conflict’

If you’re just joining me, you should know that I started blogging about my quick-starter world-building process a few weeks ago. You can go back and start here. Or, if you just wanted to read about the culture aspect, start here.

Like I stated above, we went over a quick and dirty culture build, starting with the building blocks: values/fears.

Once you’ve established that, this next step is pretty simple.

Let’s say you wanted your world to have a pantheon, or gods/spirits to worship.

Where would they look for them? In their values and fears.

A deity or deities can arise from each of the values, or one can encompass all of them. A single deity can be dichotomous – instilling values and fears.

Let’s look at the Romans: They valued many, many things, of course, and had dozens if not hundreds of deities of lesser or greater status, but for the sake of this article I am going to point out only a few.

The Romans possessed the greatest military force of its time. Ask any Roman in his day, and he might add that their avid worship of Mars (where we get the term “martial” of course) had as much to do with their prowess as did their physical conditioning, discipline and tactics. In any martial society, a way to replenish the population was absolutely necessary, so they venerated several deities presiding over different aspects (fertility, virility, pregnancy, sex, conception…). Feeding a population was also of utmost importance, so any deity related to the fertility of the land (Ceres as one of them, and she also held ground over life and death and rebirth of nature, and sacred law, and… you get it).

Fears can be leveraged in your culture, especially by people who are cunning enough to trick the people into thinking that whatever it is that they fear can be avoided, such as with sacrifices of people and treasures.

What if you don’t want supernatural beings acknowledged at all? How about that?

There are cultures that venerate or vilify actual historical figures (sometimes even alongside supernatural beings, imagine that! Ha!) Think of America’s Founding Fathers – George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere among others – who embodied values of strength, resilience, and the idea that men should be free. There’s the opposite, those who are infamous like Adolf Hitler or Josef Stalin. But there could be a smaller villain in your culture, something like:

“Now you young’uns, don’t you go traipsing off up to that old cabin at wood edge yonder. That there’s the gateway on to Hell itself, old Shakey Jake butchering them youngfolk gone creeping up there and putting his curse on all round it. That’s why nothing grows in fifty paces all around. And it don’t matter he’s been dead for nigh on a century – if’n he’s done sold his soul so’s he can walk the earth again.”

You get the idea.

Sometimes you can even reach a serendipity – where you have a value that some venerate and others vilify (like Hitler who was adored by some seriously misguided people), and this is beyond awesome for you as a writer, because it means that there’s conflict! Conflict is at the heart of every story, and if you can build that into your very culture, then you can easily insert it into your characters’ lives and give them somewhere to “go” in the story’s arc.

So, what kind of values did you come up with, and how are you using them?

Or night job, as the case may be. Lately, I’ve been tempted to throw in the towel and give up the rat race. I’m sure most people have experienced the uglier side of office politics (not ‘what’ but ‘who’ you know and how far you’re willing to stick your nose up their butt), or the stereotyping (that person’s just a dumb admin who can’t read too good) or even vicious racism or misogyny.

But… There’s a time to get disgusted and walk out, and there’s a time to hang tough. Not just for the steady paychecks (big, big reason to hang on, to be sure), but also for the conflict. I’ve frequently been finding myself thinking of the events at work: “wow, this situation reminds me of a story I read once.” Sometimes I even think what’s happening right in front of me would have required a massive suspension of disbelief in order to incorporate into a story — “you can’t make this crap up” is a common phrase uttered at work. And if it wasn’t so personal, it would be hilarious. Maybe a little softening over time and I’ll have a comic bestseller.

While I’m working on the next stories (I anticipate having Belly of the Beast published early next month), hoping I’ll be able to earn enough from my writing to keep a roof over my head and some food in my fridgeI’ll keep at it and think of it as inspiration to

And Office Space, believe it or not, is not as strange as it seems to be. Anyone who worked in an office can attest to this. The scenes with the copier? Spot on.