Posts Tagged ‘post nuke’

DISCLAIMER: Unapologetic Spoilers (If you read on, don’t blame me. You’ve been warned)

My obsession with the post-apocalypse began decades ago with George Miller’s genre-defining films, and the Wasteland and Fallout video games. Enough so, that last year (2014) I published two collections that feature some post-apoc stories (“Treasure” in Morsels and the “Ain’t No Coffee” chapter of Melange[1]) as well as a PA mystery novel, Umbra.

They pale in comparison to the mighty prosthetic strength of George Miller.

Completely skeptical in many arenas, I had been hearing about Fury Road for years, when it was an on-again, off-again project for the Happy Feet / Witches of Eastwick / Babe, Pig in the City director. He explored anime as a possible avenue, and there were brief rumors about Shia LeBouf taking the role of Max’s kid (I’m glad he failed that experiment with Indiana Jones instead). I also wasn’t sure what to make of a Mad Max who wasn’t going to be played by Mel Gibson. Remake after remake shows they don’t often get better, and most of the time are worse for all of the gimmicks and none of the story-meat.

So, I watched the trailers, and wasn’t completely turned off. Good sign.

First, the movie NEVER LETS UP. There are scarce moments to breathe, and the “slow” points in the movie don’t really drop its pace. Like downshifting, but the car is still rolling a pace that could snap your neck if you braked too hard. Except for an extremely short introduction in the very beginning (rather like The Road Warrior, but without the montage) you are dumped into the chase. Period. Miller is a master of showing, not telling, with only one very tiny, practically gasped “info-dump”. Otherwise, you glean the narrative organically as the story unfolds through action. This IS a car/rig movie, however, so those of you who just wanted to see souped-up, weaponized and apocalyptisized (yes, I just made that up) versions of vintage cars, look no further.

It also gives no quarter—just when you thought you came up for air, you find yourself smothered in dust cloud. Not everyone gets the happy ending, and one of the most heart-breaking moments in the movie comes in one of these gasps.

Anyway…

Storytellers and directors, take note: THIS is the way to do strong women in movies. Don’t insert them where they don’t belong just to 1) appeal to a young female audience and 2) bring sex incidentally into a film. Not that there’s any sex involved, at least not overtly, and not in the act of pleasure kind of way. Mostly, it’s for procreation. Or lack of. (the chastity belts worn by the brides are positively feral looking, although I think I would have kept it on until I reached my destination. Talk about your rape deterrant!). Believe it or not, there is a tiny romance subplot between a bride and one of the half-life War boys, and it’s handled a little too roughly to start, but it “moves” into its own. But the women here are strong, supportive and determined to escape and survive without having to be glammed up to do it. I could easily see myself as one of the Vuvalini (assuming I would want to survive in a post-apocalypse).

A few gimmicky moments exist to play up on the 3D version of the film (most notably the shot near the end with the guitar and the flying steering wheel), but these can be forgiven. George Miller always did have a little fun in his films, with the odd juxtaposition of the ultra-violent and quirky humor (see the exchange between Papagallo and the Mechanic).

Was there a soundtrack? Yes, there was, but the frenetic energy is so pervasive that the “music” is lost. Except for one well-placed, drop-of-the-bass dub invasion. Thanks, Junkie XL.

There are plenty of moments that call back the older movies, such as when Max, wielding a short-barreled side-by-side shotgun goes to blow some guy’s hand off and the round fizzles.[2] There is a moment when one of the brides is playing with the innards of a music box.[3] Hugh Keays-Byrne, as everyone who knows Mad Max knows, played the Toecutter in that film.[4]

Toecutter2-1

There’s even a momentary, overt nod to another director’s film, The Dark Crystal, by having people on long stilts very much reminiscent of the landstriders ridden by Jen and Kira (don’t have a still from MM:FR, so if you want to see it, BUY A TICKET!!!!).

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Count on George Miller to introduce characters with medical issues and/or prosthetics. We know the post-apoc “look” which he created in The Road Warrior went on to infect 80’s hair bands with the feathers and football gear as armor, but his inclusions called on his former career as an emergency room physician. In Mad Max it was the young cop forced to use the electrolarynx after his chase of the Nightrider leaves him with a shard of windshield glass in his throat. In the second, the most notable is the Mechanic, not confined to a wheelchair but held aloft by a cherry-picker like device cobbled together to get him around the equipment. In the third, there is Master-Blaster, a duo whose brain makes up for his lack of stature, and the brawn of which he rides to make up for his weakness for which he serves (and loves) paternally. Then, there is this movie, when it becomes a staple. Imperator Furiosa is the first notable, with her prosthetic arm, and Immortan Joe of course, but then there are the myriads of those with tumors and missing limbs, etc.

Tom Hardy’s Max is an extremely worthy successor to Mel Gibson’s Officer Rockatansky.[5] There’s more than a little nod to Bane there, George, in his and Immortan Joe’s get-ups.[6] Enough said.

latest Hugh-Keays-ByrneImmortan-Joe-Mad-Max-Fury-Road

So, this one is already going to be on my shelf the moment it is released on Blu-Ray.

AND… I have heard there is already a second/fifth one planned, called Mad Max: The Wasteland. I, for one, am looking forward to it

 

 

[1] Which are available for free on Smashwords, and possibly Amazon if they caught up. Read them and let me know what you think!

[2] From The Road Warrior, during the rig battle, when Max discovers the shell he picked up in the beginning of the movie from the dead man on the “Meek Shall Inherit” truck is a dud.

[3] Also from The Road Warrior, and also during the beginning after the battle with Wez, when he finds the music movement and later gives to the Feral Kid.

[4] Calling up of course that George Miller borrows actors from his own movies as well. I address this in another post, here.

[5] That name shows up, by the way, in House of God, Samuel Shem’s novel about a teaching hospital. George Miller finished medical school before he became a director, so might have some interest in reading that novel. Coincidence? I leave you to decide.

[6] Then again, isn’t Bane a little more “Road Warrior” than “Batman” anyway?

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As (what I hope to be) the worst of the winter weather and that vile beast known as the Polar Vortex retreats from the US, I gave pause to reflect on what has happened during those times we are most effected. For several days, many folks, including most of my family, endured without power. We were fairly lucky, as we had an alternative heating source that didn’t require electricity to operate, so we huddled next to the fire as the snow and ice coated our little slice of civilization. Meals consisted of soups, toasted cheese sandwiches, scrambled eggs -things which needed only simple preparation. We had plenty of water for tea and cocoa, not just from the on hand bottled water stores. Water for flushing the toilet came from outside where we would scoop snow into buckets and let it melt near the fireplace. So we survived until the power companies cleared ice and fallen trees and limbs from the lines and restored power.

In all of that, the one thing I missed most was the running water. Not because we needed it to drink, but we needed it to shower. I’m a hot shower person myself, and the thought of a splashdown sink bath using ice cold water made me numb just thinking about it. After the first day, I called around to relatives to find one with power and running water and asked if I might come over to use their facilities.

Analysis: One of two things is going to have to happen: 1) I would be killed in the first wave of nukes/zombies/mega virus and have little to worry about or (because I couldn’t possibly be that lucky) 2) on top of all the other prep work, I’d have to kludge a shower which would provide us with hot water.

Hot showers are entirely underrated.

Now to find a way for the protagonists of my upcoming novel, Umbra: A Post-Apocalyptic Mystery, to deal with the horrors of unwashed bodies.

(Originally posted 7 AUG 2009)

Nearly all media contains the inherent promise of a good ol’ yarn. Movies, TV shows and books may be the most obvious, and there’s always some type of story, or at least a background/meaning behind two dimensional art. Modern video games are rich with interactive storytelling, but even the eldest games (you know you remember Asteroids, which is purportedly going to be made into a movie based on its minimalist premise of shooting asteroids to save the Earth) contained some grain of an adventure beyond just pummeling the joystick fire button for the top score. Not all storylines are worth the cost of the movie ticket/ reading time/ hours wasted in front of the computer/ tv screen, but the fact remains they exist.

So what? you ask. There’s a story. I don’t really care about the story as long as I get to slaughter raiders/ mobsters/ bug-eyed aliens/ ghosts/ etc. While that may be true for some players, that fact is at the heart of all these stories, the author/ designer/ artist consciously chose the setting for the media. Some start with the setting “I’d like to design a space MMO*” and some with the character(s) “I’m painting fairies.” Occasionally an author or designer nurtures the storyline independently, then drops the characters into different settings to see what happens. Sometimes the setting is extremely important, and sometimes its just incidental (Star Wars could also have taken place in a Western or Fantasy setting with a little tweaking, and that’s why its called Space Opera and not true Science Fiction, but more on that at a later date).

So why choose the post-apocalyptic setting?

Post-apocalypse contains an inherent “cool factor” – the burnt out landscape dotted with skeletal trees and collapsed building and the possibility of the family dog mutating into a two-ton, acid-drooling, bloodthirsty beast make it an alien landscape in its own right. While post-apoc settings are beginning to become more commonplace, the “other” settings already count themselves in the “Done-to-Death” club. Some folks don’t mind seeing the same stories played out in the same settings over and over, but others prefer some novelty and the post-nuclear provides.

Then there’s the paranoia factor. Some modern games make it seem like everyone and their brother, sister, and even their grandmother is out to get the hero for little sense other than the main hero needs something to shoot back at. But move that to a post-apocalyptic setting, and suddenly everyone is out to get you, for their basic survival (hey, they can probably smell that can of Spam you just found. Or they smell you. Mmmm, tasty). Everyone trying to shoot or gut you suddenly makes sense.

Let’s not forget the interesting juxtaposition of the modern versus the primitive. We’ve already seen this kind of thing in history (the natives teaching guerilla tactics to the American colonists to best the better- outfitted English armies), in tons of science fiction tales where A) Space-faring earthlings encounter primitive alien species or B) vastly technologically-superior aliens arrive on earth. Then again there could be a more “modern” modern setting, where heavily-armed astronauts end up landing in the Amazon and for some reason being hunted by a tribe or tribes there. (If there’s a story like this out there, let me know. An interesting premise to try reading, at any rate).

Not always, but in enough media, the post-apocalyptic setting becomes the reason itself for the story, the backdrop as theme, if you will. The reason there exists a story of this type is that the world is the way it is because of mankind, and its folly in destroying itself. The promise is gone and its skeleton is the raped landscape, fallen buildings and spiritually-crushed people. Good stories in the post-apoc setting use it. It is a backdrop to show that mankind is continually spiralling downward, never learning the lessons of the past, the ugliness perpetuating until mankind swallows itself whole. It is a juxtaposition to illustrate mankind’s ability to press on, and even to learn from his mistakes and this time, try virtue. All it takes is one man to be the tiny white flower growing in the vast, barren landscape.

Next time you watch/ play/ read, think for a moment if the setting is important to the tale, or if it makes the movie/ game/ novel transcend in terms of the message it is trying to deliver. You may just discover post-apocalyptia holds a few cards that cannot be accessed in fantasy or space genres.

*Author’s Note: If there are any designers reading this who wish to design a space MMORPG that is truly character-based and isn’t going to nerf the crap out of itself like Galaxies, mucho kudos to you. We need more space and less fantasy out there. And by the way, I know about Fallen Earth, too, so no more e-mails on that one =o) Thanks. You’ve been kind.